Stringing Report for ITF Pro Circuit $15K Futures of Winston-Salem

At the ITF Pro Circuit $15K Futures of Winston-Salem last week, I strung rackets for 34 different players.

33 players used all monofilament strings, including one who used a hybrid of two different monofilaments (Luxilon 4G S mains and Luxilon Alu Power crosses). One player used a traditional hybrid of Luxilon Alu Power mains and Wilson Sensation crosses.

Here are the brands of string we saw in our stringing room:

  1. Solinco – 38%
  2. Luxilon – 21%
  3. Babolat – 12%
  4. Yonex – 9%
  5. Pacific, Genesis – 6%
  6. Dunlop, Head, Tecnifibre – 3%

(Note that 3% = 1 racket.)

Solinco

As I noted in my post on stringing at the NCAA tournament recently, the plurality of players using Solinco string is evidence of their success in connecting with junior and college players, and those connections seem to be percolating up to the lower levels of professional tennis now (which see a large number of junior and college players involved).

On the ATP World Tour, Luxilon is still the dominant string, but we do see more Solinco string there, too.

More in later posts on racket brands and tensions.

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2 comments

  1. Mo · June 11, 2015

    Are most people using 1.20 string as indicated in your picture? Or is that just a photo of your Solinco stock for your regular customers?

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    • bigtimetennis · June 11, 2015

      Sorry that was just a stock photo of Solinco string. 1.20mm string is fairly rare, though one player at the Future of Winston-Salem was using Tour Bite 1.20mm. At other professional events I have seen Luxilon Timo 1.10 and 1.17, as well as Luxilon Ace 1.12. The most common gauges among professionals I would say is 1.25mm, and among amateurs 1.30mm, though more amateurs are going thinner.

      Also – good to refer to string in millimeters rather than by “gauge” (16, 16L, 17, etc.) since different strings label their gauges differently. Babolat RPM 17, for example, is 1.25mm, while Solinco calls its 1.25mm string 16L.

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